Q is for Quints

Apparently my mother found the Dionne Quintuplets fascinating. Stashed away were some yellowed clippings featuring cute photos and little vignettes about the five girls who were born in 1934. My mother would have been ten years old that year.

Vintage clipping of the Canadian quints

Vintage clipping of the Canadian quints

This ad shows how popular the little girls were. Advertisers wanted to cash in on the public obsession with the quintuplets.

Palmolive soap advertisement with the Dionne quintuplets.

Palmolive soap advertisement with the Dionne quintuplets.

Removed from their family, the girls were raised by the Canadian government while being displayed as a tourist attraction. It’s rather a sad story, but I doubt that people in the 1930s were aware of the issues surrounding the rearing of the girls.

The quintuplets with one of their caregivers.

The quintuplets with one of their caregivers.

Another newspaper clipping about the children.

Another newspaper clipping about the children. This one tells about some of the problems with managing the lives of the little celebrities.

All their activities became fodder for press releases to satisfy public curiosity.

All their activities became fodder for press releases to satisfy public curiosity.

I don’t think these are clippings that Mom saved from her childhood. It’s doubtful they would have survived the many family moves over the years. Most likely she discovered them in recent years in a scrapbook at a yard sale. I’m guessing they triggered some nostalgia and she saved them as the basis for a future article.

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4 thoughts on “Q is for Quints

  1. I’ve done some reading on them. I remember hearing some about them when I was younger, but I got more interested once I had twins. Those girls were kept from their own mother, kept on a strict schedule. It was all fake and for profit, which they didn’t benefit from at all. It’s a terrible story.

    Liked by 1 person

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