The McGhee Sisters and the Dogs

Our cousin Bob surprises us now and then with a “new” old picture. Here’s one we hadn’t seen before of my mother (Gail) and her two sisters. I need to find an incentive to get Bob to scanning all those photos he inherited from his mother.

mcghee-sisters-and-puppies

The McGhee sisters – Carol, Melba, and Gail

Our cousin group on Facebook had all sorts of questions like whose dogs were they, what were their names, and what was the location of the picture?

My Aunt Carol, the littlest girl in the picture said, “I have no idea whose dogs, names; I would suppose it was our yard. Never saw this photo before! Pretty much no memories from this age.
However, after studying on the locale, this may be the lease northeast of Madison, where we lived when I went to first grade in Madison. Then we moved to the lease where I attended Seeley School until mid-6th grade when we moved to the farm.
I don’t remember us having more than one dog at a time. One memory: I remember Gail and I going into the Madison school, she would go up the stairs to the 2nd floor, and I would go down the hall to my 1st-grade room. I would look back, Gail would wave, and I would then continue, comforted that she would be there when it was time to go home.”
My comment was that I looked like my Mom at this age. My sister commented on that too.
Cousin Bob shared what he knew, “Mom wrote the location on some of her pictures but nothing by this one. There are some good ones of you, Carol, I’ll have you scan some of them for you. Our best guess judging by other photos around this one is 1938 or 39.”
If it is 1938 or 39, here are the ages to go with the girls: Melba – 18 or 19, Gail – 14 or 15, Carol – 4 or 5.
oops duplicate post
This photo is posted in response to the Sepia Saturday challenge. Here’s the challenge for September 14 that inspired this post.

Gail’s Birthday

Happy Birthday, Mom! Gail was born in 1924. If we were baking a cake for her, it would need 95 candles to celebrate the day.

Thank you to all the followers of this blog. I love that I can share memories of my mother with you here. I hope that you’ve discovered a recipe to try or a craft to make or just enjoyed some of her writings and some of my memories of her.

The Wooden Nickels

“Don’t take any wooden nickels.” This old saying wasn’t adhered to by Gail and Clyde Martin. They actively sought out wooden nickels for their collection which they displayed on their living room wall.

wooden nickle collection

Gail and Clyde Martin’s wooden nickel collection.

They had vintage ones and new ones too. Sometimes local businesses would print up some as an advertising gimmick. Gail and Clyde found so many that they wouldn’t all fit into their display cases.

wooden nickels - advertising

An assortment of wooden nickels

Here is a sampling of ones they picked up over the years.

  • Dalton Museum – Coffeyville, KS
  • Greenwood County Historical Museum – Eureka, KS
  • Pony Express Museum – Marysville, KS
  • Chamber of Commerce – Waterville, KS
  • Madison Kansas Centennial

Friends and family found some further afield and sent them to boost the collection. For their 40th wedding anniversary, their daughter, Virginia had wooden nickels printed for them to give to the guests.

anniversary wooden nickel

Their specially printed wooden nickel for their 40th anniversary.

I’m sure Gail researched the history of wooden nickels and found that the earliest ones go back to the 1880s and were issued at times of coin shortages. They became popular in the 1930s when the tokens were issued at fairs and festivals to commemorate the event. Merchants also issued them offering something free if the wooden token was presented in their store.

Have you ever found a wooden nickel?

Clyde’s Cheese Fudge

This recipe was in an email of Gail Lee Martin’s that I had saved. I must say that I’ve never tried making it. As a matter of fact, I never even had a chance to taste it.  If my siblings are reading this, I’m hinting that a small sampling of Dad’s Velveeta Fudge would be a great birthday gift.

 

Your Dad’s recipe for great fudge made with cheese.

Velveeta Fudge

Ingredients:
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
8 ounces pasteurized process cheese, Velveeta, cubed
1 1/2 pounds confectioners’ sugar, about 5 cups unsifted
1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa
1/2 cup non-fat dry milk
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups coarsely chopped pecans or walnuts
Preparation:
In a large saucepan over medium heat butter and cheese cubes together, stirring frequently; remove from heat. Sift together confectioners’ sugar and cocoa; add to cheese, mixing well. Stir in non-fat dry milk, vanilla and nuts. Turn into a 9x9x2-inch pan; chill until firm and cut into squares. Makes about 3 pounds of Velveeta Fudge.

I know the folks used to get cheese in the commodities distribution that the government did for seniors. Not sure if it was Velveeta or just something similar. They used to joke that the government was trying to get rid of all the old folks by giving them artery-clogging foods like cheese.